Have you ever tried honeysuckle? honeyMan when I was a kid I used to love tasting honeysuckle. If you’re not familiar with the plant, it is essentially a small white or yellow flower that produces small amounts of edible nectar that can be pulled out and eaten. Each individual flower hardly provides enough satisfaction, and so as kids it wasn’t uncommon for us to sit by honeysuckle bushes and eat nectar for 10, maybe 15 minutes at a time. It wasn’t that we thought it was real honey or anything, but it was tangible and reminded us of what the real thing was like. Each taste only left us longing for more.

Isn’t that what its like for us now in our communion with Christ? There are some days that go by where everything I do, whether its in prayer, reading the scriptures, sharing my faith with others, engaging in Christian fellowship and worship, participating in the church gathered; everything I do just leaves me longing for more. Experiencing the grace of God is so satisfying and never lacking. I just can’t get enough.

Other days are quite the opposite.

Some days feel more like a desert than sitting near a provision of his grace. There are some weeks where it feels so long since I’ve had just a drop – a small drop – of anything even remotely satisfying or quenching that I’m left desperate even for one microscopic taste of grace. Oh how I would desire just a taste! Oh God on those days would you just grant me one small drop of your grace again? Do not keep your presence far from me! As a deer pants for flowing streams, so pants my soul for you, O God! My soul thirsts for God, for the living God (Psalm 42:1-2)!

And this is his kindness toward us, that when we feel ourselves distant and in a drought, God is eager to once again lavish on us the taste of his goodness and grace. His Spirit cries out from within us, “taste and see that the Lord is good!” For those who are in Christ, God promises a river of living water (John 7:38) and bread that will never leave us hungry (John 6:35). Like the Israelites who ate manna in the wilderness, so too does God give us means of grace to nourish us on our pilgrimage.

There is a tension now in the reality of this life. As we look forward to the day when our cup will never be empty and our plates will always be full, in this life God has given us his means of grace to nourish and satisfy us. Every moment in prayer, every moment in the word, every moment gathered with the church, every time we partake in the Holy Communion is as if grasping for small tastes of something sweet and nourishing. Satisfied yet never full; delighted and always longing for more. Mere drops of what is to come with the flowing, endless rivers of joy, peace, love and grace.



2 thoughts on “Taste and See!”

Erwin Camacho Jr. · February 18, 2014 at 7:47 pm

thanks so much for this. it reminds me of Romans 8:22-23 when it says how the creation groans in pains of childbirth and not just creation but we ourselves. So it is very true that we can and will delight in God in amazing ways in our lifetime if we walk with Christ, but we still are, will be, and should be longing for more and our experiences should only make us desire Christ all the more and look forward to the day when our cups will always be full.

    goingtodamascus · March 3, 2014 at 7:56 pm

    Hey dude! Just realized I never responded to you. My bad. Thanks so much for reading! And yeah, it blows my mind to think about how much Christ can and does satisfy now but its a mere fraction of what awaits..crazy!!!

Leave a Reply

Related Posts

Practical Theology

As Seen on TV: Racism and Our Beauty Disorder

They say that each generation has one or two – maybe three – television events which shape the personality and psyche of the entire generation. We remember the sights and sounds of that day, where Read more…

Practical Theology

Capturing a Vision for Pastoral Internships

It has become evident to me that when it comes to pastoral internships we are facing a systemic crisis. Poorly trained pastoral interns leads to poorly trained pastors. We have forgotten the importance of pastoral internships. What we need is a big, robust vision of pastoral internships that is worthy of the high calling which Christ has given to his church.

Practical Theology

When Congregants Become Consumers

Have you ever been frustrated at the prevalent disregard Americans show toward experts in fields that laypeople otherwise know nothing about? Joe Average who thinks he knows as much about the political system as the Read more…